William Ellis (Jr.) [Pea.]

M, b. circa 1787, d. 10 May 1861
FatherWilliam Ellis (Sr.) b. 22 Aug 1756, d. 2 Jun 1841
MotherMary Galsworthy b. c 1757
Birth*circa 1787  
Marriage*1 October 1812 St. Mary's Anglican Church, Bideford, Devon, England; by license - William 'of Bideford'; Bride=Grace Williams 
Occupation*1819 Bideford, Devon, England; a joiner 
Residence*1842 Market Place, Bideford, Devon, England; [next to the Peacock Inn] 
Event-Misc*28 November 1855 the lease of the Peacock [Inn], Bideford, Devon, England; Type: Deed '... dwelling house etc. Peacock [Inn] feoffees of LB to Wm E [Ellis] lease 99 years [to be determined ?] on death of Marino Ellis John Ellis & Ann Stone (Marino aged 18 gdaughter [granddaughter] of Wm. Ellis)' 
Burial*1861 Old Town Cemetery, Bideford, Devon, England 
Death*10 May 1861 Bull [Butt?] Hill (at the River end of Meddon St.), Bideford, Devon, England; late Landlord of the Peacock [Inn]; aged 74 years 

Family

Grace Williams b. bt 1787 - 1791, d. 7 Oct 1878
Marriage*1 October 1812 St. Mary's Anglican Church, Bideford, Devon, England; by license - William 'of Bideford'; Bride=Grace Williams 

Robert Ellis

M, b. circa 1797, d. 28 August 1872
Kit # 50850 - Robert Ellis (1797, London England-1872, Summerside Prince Edward Island)
FatherWilliam Ellis (Sr.) b. 22 Aug 1756, d. 2 Jun 1841
MotherMary Galsworthy b. c 1757
ChartsKit #'s 51017, 50850, 95369, Direct Male Descendants of Johan Ellis (b. c.1549 ) (Haplogroup J2)
Birth*circa 1797 London, England 
Marriage*6 July 1823 Bedeque, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Canada; by Thomas Chanter, J.P.; Bride=Hannah Darby, JP=Thomas P. Chanter 
Death*28 August 1872 Summerside, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Canada; aged 75, of cancer 
Burial*1 September 1872 St. John's Anglican Church Cemetery, St. Eleanor's, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, Canada; of cancer, aged 75 

Family

Hannah Darby d. 4 Feb 1891
Children

Grace Williams

F, b. between 1787 and 1791, d. 7 October 1878
Birth*between 1787 and 1791 Devon, England; aged 50-54 in 1841 
Marriage*1 October 1812 St. Mary's Anglican Church, Bideford, Devon, England; by license - William 'of Bideford'; Groom=William Ellis (Jr.) [Pea.] 
Burial*1878 Old Town Cemetery, Bideford, Devon, England 
Death*7 October 1878 Church Gate, Bideford, Devon, England; aged 88 

Family

William Ellis (Jr.) [Pea.] b. c 1787, d. 10 May 1861

James Ellis

M, b. 26 December 1781
FatherWilliam Ellis (Sr.) b. 22 Aug 1756, d. 2 Jun 1841
MotherMary Galsworthy b. c 1757
Baptism*26 December 1781 St. Mary's Anglican Church, Bideford, Devon, England 

Thomas Eugene Ellis

M, b. 1900
FatherThomas Rodman Ellis b. 1871
ChartsKit # 787856, Direct Male Descendants of Benjamin Ellis (Haplogroup I Unmatched)
Birth*1900 Port Maitland, Nova Scotia, Canada 

Thomas Rodman Ellis

M, b. 1871
FatherDaniel B. Ellis b. c 1820
ChartsKit # 787856, Direct Male Descendants of Benjamin Ellis (Haplogroup I Unmatched)
Birth*1871 Sandford, Nova Scotia, Canada 

Family

Child

Selena Maud Knipe

F
Marriage* Groom=Joseph Wilson Ellis 

Family

Joseph Wilson Ellis b. 1874, d. 1971
Child

C. Lee Ellis

M, b. circa 1901, d. 1983
FatherLee Berkley Ellis b. 18 Jan 1864
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*circa 1901 Texas, USA 
Death*1983 Texas, USA 

Lee Berkley Ellis

M, b. 18 January 1864
FatherBenjamin Thomas Ellis b. 9 Oct 1825, d. 22 Apr 1874
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*18 January 1864 Lone Pine, Houston County, Texas, USA 

Family

Child

Benjamin Thomas Ellis

M, b. 9 October 1825, d. 22 April 1874
FatherJohn Irving Ellis b. 6 Oct 1799
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*9 October 1825 Mississippi, USA 
Death*22 April 1874 Lone Pine, Houston County, Texas, USA 

Family

Child

John Irving Ellis

M, b. 6 October 1799
FatherBenjamin Ellis b. 1772, d. 10 Oct 1843
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*6 October 1799 Kentucky, USA 

Family

Child

Benjamin Ellis

M, b. 1772, d. 10 October 1843
FatherChristopher Ellis b. 1747, d. Jul 1820
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*1772 Iredell, Rowan Or Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, USA 
Death*10 October 1843 Houston County, Texas, USA 

Family

Child

Christopher Ellis

M, b. 1747, d. July 1820
ChartsKit # 105989, Direct Male Descendants of Christopher Ellis (1747-1820) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*1747 Sussex County, Virginia, USA 
Death*July 1820 Iredell County, North Carolina, USA 

Family

Child

Richard Ellis

M, b. 1704, d. 7 October 1797
ChartsKit # GB2119, Direct Male Descendants of Richard Ellis (1704-1797) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Note* [Working File.FTW]


From 'Richard Ellis and his Descendants, 1888'.

Richard Ellis, was according to his own account, born in Dublin, Ireland,August 16th, 1704. His father was a native of Wales, England, and hismother may have been a Welsh or Irish woman.

Richard said that his father was an officer in one of the many armedforces that at that time were numerous throughout the British dominions.Just at what time his father went to Ireland does not appear from anyrecord that are now accessible.

Richard's youth was spent in Dublin, and he mentioned having traveled inother portions of Ireland. This unhappy country then, as now, was thescene of much disorder. The strife was mostly between Catholics andProtestants, or those in favor of or against whoever happened to occupythe throne. Richard said that tit was a common occurrence, seeminglyenjoyed as a pastime, for the officers of the army or order, in themorning, before breakfast, a squad of prisoners 'drawn in quarters,'hanged or shot. Such scenes were made public spectacles, and were saidto give the officers a relish for their meals.

When Richard was thirteen years of age, his father having died, hismother undertook to send him to Virginia where he had an uncle with whomshe expected he would find a home. With this view she paid for him acabin passage to this country, but the captain of the vessel violated histrust, and landing at a seaport in Massachusetts he, in accordance with acustom then somewhat prevalent, sold the boy, for his services, until hebecame of age, ostensibly to pay for his passage.

Richard said that he became a member of the family of a miller who was avery stern man, and often harsh with his own children, consisting ofseveral daughters, yet to him he always showed the utmost considerationand kindness. Of his mistress he always spoke highly, especially of herefforts for his mental and moral improvement. He made some progress ineducation in Dublin, but of this he said nothing, thinking thereby thathis new teacher would give him more attention. On several occasions heexcited her surprise by pronouncing difficult words in advance of herinstructions.

After Richard attained his majority, he went to Easton, Bristol County,Mass., where in 1728, he married Jane Phillips, daughter of Captain JohnPhillips, and sister of Thos. Phillips, who afterwards was the secondsettler in Ashfield. Richard lived in Easton until about 1740, when heremoved to Deerfield in the same state. Six of his children were born inEaston, and one or more in Deerfield. Altogether he had nine children,but one, Benjamin, died at two months of age.

Richard's father-in-law, Captain John Phillips of Easton, was one of thesoldiers in the expedition against Quebec in 1690, and consequently wasamong those who became entitled to 'rights' of land. This fact probablywas what led Richard and family, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Phillips,to settle in Ashfield, (thin called Huntstown,) which he, Richard, didabout 1745. (Richard's son John, born in Deerfield, 1742, said hisfather removed to Ashfield when he was three years of age.) Ashfield wasthen a wilderness and Richard was the first settler. The locality wherehe selected his 'right' and made his home is about one and one-half milenortheast of what is now known as Ashfield Plain, and is in the northeastpart of the township. At this point two roads cross at right angels, andRichard's house and farm was on the southeast corner where, forty yearsago, Hiram Belding, Esq, lived and where Mr. Leonard D. Lanfair nowresides. Richard's house was about six rods southeasterly from Mr.Lanfair's home. One-half mile, or less, west of this point is Bellow'sHill, and eighty rods north, Bear River runs from west to east. OppositeRichard's house on the north side of the road, and about forty rods east,is an ancient burying ground where lie the earthly remains of RichardEllis and his wife and several of their descendants.

Of the scenes and incidents among the pioneers of this rough and ruggedcountry, much has come down by tradition to this present time. Thecountry was mountainous, being the eastern slope of the Hoosac range. Theroads consisted mostly of trails and cow-paths; the snows were deep andthe winters most rigorous. Added to all the other obstacles, which theearly settlers had to encounter, was the greatest of all, the danger fromthe tomahawk, and scalping-knife of the Indians. On one occasion Richardwas alarmed by the Indians while in his sugar bush and, it is said, hemade quick time to a place of safety with his five-pail kettle on hisback.

Richard related that, not infrequently, messengers would ride swiftlythrough the country giving warning to the inhabitants that the Indianswere coming down upon them. At such times the women and children wouldbe quickly placed on pack-horses and started for the old for atDeerfield, some ten or twelve miles easterly from the Ellis settlement.Then the men and boys would rally with their guns and drive back thesavage foes. These Indians were from New York and Canada, and were veryjealous of the encroachments of the white man. The old Fort at Deerfieldwas constructed in early times, as a defense against the Indians, and didgood service for more than a century.

Few of this generation can realize the privations and dangers encounteredby the heroic men and women who pushed their way into these wildernessregions. Nearly all the conveniences of modern lifer were unknown amongthem. Simple and rude were all their implements. Going to church, totown, to mill, or on a neighborhood visit, was either on foot orhorseback. Sometimes, in the spring of the year, from backwardness ofthe season, provisions became exhausted, and some of the inhabitants wereobliged, it was said, to subsist for a time on the buds and tender leavesof basswood trees until crows could be grown. Not all even had salt forsuch a repast as this, and those who had were regarded as quitefortunate. But in spite of all their privations, they grew up a mostvigorous race of men and women, whose posterity have gone out and made acreditable mark on all the institutions of this country; and the wealthof character developed by these sturdy men and women, has been a richinheritance for their children. No privations or obstacles seemed todaunt them, and in some ways unnecessary exposures were sought andencouraged as evidences of manly strength and in the belief that theirsystems were improved thereby. It is related that with some it was alifetime custom, even in mid-winter, to jump out of bed in the morning,and without dressing, rush out to the wood pile, kick off the snow, andgather wood and kindling for the morning fire. They fancied that by suchmeans their constitutions were invigorated; and certain it is that manyof them lived to a great age.

Richard Ellis was a true and loyal subject of the King of England, and in1754 when war broke out between England and France and was extended tothis country, and known as the 'French and Indian War,' Richard was forabout three years an officer in the commissary department of the Englishor Colonial service in New England and New York. Richard Ellis, it issaid, was a man of strong will and remarkable memory; his physical vigorand mental powers were retained in a high degree up to the last years ofhis life. His grandson, Dimick Ellis, who was born in Ashfield in 1776,was familiar with Richard during the last twenty years of his life, andfrom him the writer (his grandson) obtained most of the items for thissketch. About the year 1764, Richard kept a country store and ashery inthe northeast part of Colerain, a town about 15 miles in a northeasterlydirection from Ashfield. His ledger or book of accounts covering theperiod from 1764 to about 1777, together with some correspondence hadwith him and other before and during the great Revolution, are now inpossession of the great grandson, Mr. Lewis Ellis, of Belding, MI. Thesebooks are quite a curiosity at this late day and give one quite aninsight into what constituted articles of consumption in those times. Inthem are found the names of nearly tow hundred persons who were residentsat that time, of Colerain, and adjoining towns. Rum and tobacco werearticles then, as now, of too frequent use, judging from the charges inthese books. It is probable that this mercantile experience of Richard'swas not a financial success which may be accounted for from the factthat, according to his books, the largest part of pay for his goods hetook in ashes, which he converted into pot and pearlash in his ashery.

It also appears that Richard engaged in the milling business, in companywith Mr. Chileab Smith, Sr., who was the third settler in Ashfield. Theirmill was the one built into that section, and was located on Bear River,about one hundred rods north of Richard's house, and about twenty rodseast of the bridge on the roadway running north toward 'Baptist Corners,'as the neighborhood where Mr. Smith lived was called. This gristmill wasa very primitive structure, as were all similar mills in those times. Thegrinding stones were run by waterpower, but the bolting and elevating wasdone by hand or manual labor.

In later years this mill came into the ownership of Richard's son Lieut.John Ellis and one of the Smiths, son of Chileab Smith, who conducted itfor a number of years. It would seem that the milling business washereditary among Richard Ellis' descendants. Besides Lieut. John,Richard's youngest son Caleb, who settled at Ellisburg, Jefferson County,New York, about 1795, built mills there.

Also Richard's grandsons (sons of Reuben), Benjamin and Richard, andBenjamin's sons, Stephen, Moses and Benjamin Jr., were millers nearly alltheir lives. The latter built and operated grist and saw mills, in NewYork, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, as do several of their descendantsdown to the present time.

About the year 1760 Richard's wife, Jane Phillips, died, and some twelveyears afterwards he married Mary, widow of John Henry of Deerfield, atown adjoining Colerain where he then lived, and had his store andashery. Some years later, probably during the period of the Revolution,Richard returned to Ashfield, where he spent the remainder of his dayswith his son John and grandsons Benjamin, Richard and David Ellis (sonsof Reuben), and granddaughter Jemima Smith Annable, wife of Lieut. EdwardAnnable of Ashfield.

That Richard Ellis' father was Welsh admits of no doubt, for besidesRichard's own statement to that effect most of his descendants resemblethat people and of them show marked peculiarities of the Welsh race downto the sixth generation. This is not surprising, for it is well knownthat peculiarities or traits of character are often very enduring.Strongly developed traits in a father will often show through manygenerations.

This is seen well illustrated in the Jews, who although scattered throughdifferent countries and subject to many adverse influences retain theirearly marks of character and features to the present day.

Of Richard Ellis' religious proclivities the writer knows little morethan that he was an ardent Protestant, and it is fair to surmise that theideas of religious liberty which brought the pilgrims to this countryfully impressed him was a youth and extended to his manhood as well asthrough his entire life. Among the first settlers in Ashfield and evenin the same neighborhood where Richard made a settlement, the Baptistswere the first to organize their church and erect a meeting house, andfrom that time to the present that denomination has held a leading partin the religious sentiment of that part of the town of Ashfield.Three-fourths of a mile north of Richard's house was located the meetinghouse for this sect, and from that time to this that locality has beenknown as 'Baptist Corners.' The first minister located there was Rev.Ebenezer Smith, who married in 1756, Remember, the second daughter ofRichard Ellis.

Richard died October 7, 1797, in his 94th year, at the house of hisgrandson Richard, the fourth son of Reuben Ellis. This Richard was bornin 1760 in Ashfield, and soon after his grandfather's death moved to thenorthern part of Pennsylvania, where he engaged in milling and foundedthe town of Ellisburg, Potter County, where he died in 1841. Hisdaughter Lucretia, who was born in 1806, and who is now the wife of Rev.John Stipp, a Presbyterian minister of Scio, Oregon, gives the followingaccount of the last days of Richard Ellis, the subject of this sketch.The letter is dated Scio, May 26, 1884:

'I do not know how old my great grandfather was when he came to live withmy father in Ashfield, but I have heard my father say that he was veryspry and at 80 years of age could jump upon a horse from the ground aseasily as a boy. He always appeared well: the night before he died hecalled my father, at least my father thought so, but when he went to himhe said he had not called him. The second time likewise he thought heheard him call, but was again mistaken but at the third time my greatgrandfather said, 'Well, go to bed, child, it is a token of my death, Ihave I not called you?' He died in the morning about nine o'clockapparently without pain. 
Birth*1704  
Marriage*6 October 1728 Easton, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA; Bride=Jane Phillips 
Death*7 October 1797 Ashfield, Franklin County, Massachusetts, USA 

Family

Jane Phillips b. 1 Jul 1709, d. 1760
Children

Homer John Ellis , Jr.

M, b. 31 January 1918, d. 5 January 1976
FatherHomer John Ellis , Sr. b. 11 Nov 1887, d. 16 Jan 1949
MotherMabel Woolston b. 15 May 1890, d. 10 Aug 1964
ChartsKit # GB2119, Direct Male Descendants of Richard Ellis (1704-1797) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Birth*31 January 1918 Brooklyn Borough, New York City, New York, USA 
Death*5 January 1976 Erie, Erie County, Pennsylvania, USA 

Ellen Ellis

F, b. 1850
FatherIsaac Ellis b. Mar 1822, d. a 1900
MotherMargaret Boomer b. 23 Jan 1832, d. 30 Jan 1864
Birth*1850 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 
Marriage*circa 1875 Unadilla, Otoe county, Nebraska, USA; Groom=Henry Moore 

Family

Henry Moore

Alexander Ellis

M, b. 1852
FatherIsaac Ellis b. Mar 1822, d. a 1900
MotherMargaret Boomer b. 23 Jan 1832, d. 30 Jan 1864
Birth*1852 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Benjamin Ellis

M, b. 27 July 1855, d. November 1929
FatherIsaac Ellis b. Mar 1822, d. a 1900
MotherMargaret Boomer b. 23 Jan 1832, d. 30 Jan 1864
Birth*27 July 1855 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 
Marriage*23 July 1873 Spring Bay, Illinois, USA; Bride=Catherine Snyder 
Death*November 1929 Cherryvale, Kansas, USA; Unknown GEDCOM info: Heart Disease 

Family

Catherine Snyder b. 6 Sep 1856, d. 23 Jan 1939

James Ellis

M, b. 12 August 1792, d. 31 March 1823
FatherCaleb Ellis b. 16 Aug 1754, d. 11 Apr 1813
MotherMary Crouch b. 4 Aug 1757, d. 3 Mar 1813
ChartsKit # GB2119, Direct Male Descendants of Richard Ellis (1704-1797) (Haplogroup R1b Unmatched)
Note* [Working File.FTW]


From 'Richard Ellis and his Descendants, 1888'.

'Jame Ellis, seventh child of Caleb, was born Aug. 12th 1792. About 1815he married Rachel Weiser of Ellisburg, where they raised a family of fourchildren. Mr. Ellis was a farmer. He was a soldier in the War of 1812,and in the battles of Sackett's Harbor and Big Sandy Creek, JeffersonCounty, New York. Hied died in Ellisburg, NY, in 1823.' 
Birth*12 August 1792 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 
Marriage*circa 1815 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Bride=Rachel Weiser 
Death*31 March 1823 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Family

Rachel Weiser d. 1858
Children

Rachel Weiser

F, d. 1858
Note* [Working File.FTW]


From 'Richard Ellis and his Descendants, 1888'.

'Rachel Weiser, was a daughter of Nicholas Weiser and Margaret Walrad,his wife. They were from the Mohawk valley in Montgomery County, NY, butsettled in Ellisburgh early in the present century. Nicholas Weiser wasa soldier in the Revolutionary War, and famous as a scout, and wasgreatly feared by the Indians and Tories. His father, Conrad Weiser, aman of learning and genius, came from Germany in 1711, and settled in NewYork. Mrs. Rachel Weiser Ellis raised a family of four children, threeof whom are now living. She died in Ellisburg in 1858.' 
Birth* New York, USA 
Marriage*circa 1815 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Groom=James Ellis 
Death*1858 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Family

James Ellis b. 12 Aug 1792, d. 31 Mar 1823
Children

Mary Ann Ellis

F, b. 1816
FatherJames Ellis b. 12 Aug 1792, d. 31 Mar 1823
MotherRachel Weiser d. 1858
Birth*1816 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Thomas Ellis

M, b. 1817, d. 1876
FatherJames Ellis b. 12 Aug 1792, d. 31 Mar 1823
MotherRachel Weiser d. 1858
Marriage* Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Bride=Cynthia Sherman 
Birth*1817 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 
Death*1876 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Family

Cynthia Sherman b. 1826

John W. Ellis

M, b. 1818
FatherJames Ellis b. 12 Aug 1792, d. 31 Mar 1823
MotherRachel Weiser d. 1858
Birth*1818 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 
Marriage*circa 1842 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA; Bride=Mary Fuller 

Family

Mary Fuller b. 1825

Mary Crouch

F, b. 4 August 1757, d. 3 March 1813
Note* [Working File.FTW]


From 'Richard Ellis and his Descendants, 1888'.

Where she was born or married does not appear from any records found. Shedied in Ellisburg, NY on April 1813. She and her husband are said tohave been members of the Methodist church. 
Birth*4 August 1757  
Marriage*circa 1779 Guilford, Vermont, USA; Groom=Caleb Ellis 
Death*3 March 1813 Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, USA 

Family

Caleb Ellis b. 16 Aug 1754, d. 11 Apr 1813
Children